Printed and Co. Goes Live!

At 6pm tonight BeFabBeCreative’s brand new Printed & Co will be launched in the Kalopsia Gallery, Edinburgh.

Printed & Co is a collection of textile designs from ten designers from across the UK. The designs are available to order per metre and can be printed on several natural fabrics such as Fife linen, silk, cotton and bamboo. To celebrate the launch there will be products on display – examples of what can be made from our fabrics.

Party Time, Printed & Co launch is tonight!

Party Time, Printed & Co launch is tonight!

Most of the designers have had interesting commissions already from leading interiors and fashion houses and from public bodies so it gives me enormous pleasure to be included in such a dynamic group of designers.

The company is the brainchild of sisters Solii & Zoe, owners of BeFabBeCreative, a stunningly efficient and accurate digital fabric print bureau.  Seeing the many and varied designs come through their studio, Solii and Zoe, decided to create a platform where designs can be purchased on line.  They have selected ten designers each with their own strong and distinctive style and created Printed & Co – a fresh place to search for fabric for interiors or tailoring.

Please be one of the first to look through the collection Printed and Co fabrics, it is so well curated I am quite certain you will find it an inspiring website to browse. And if you are coming to the launch tonight, don’t forget your ticket!

'Feed the Birds' print on Fife Linen

‘Feed the Birds’ print on Fife Linen

'Punch Holes' in inky blue. Printed on silk and formed into a top.

‘Punch Holes’ in inky blue. Printed on silk and formed into a top.

'Botanical DNA' in inky blue. Printed on Fife Linen

‘Botanical DNA’ in inky blue. Printed on Fife Linen

'Fennel Tangle' Orange printed on silk and formed into a top.

‘Fennel Tangle’ Orange printed on silk and formed into a top.

 

'Feed the Birds' (multi) printed on Fife linen

‘Feed the Birds’ (multi) printed on Fife linen

 

Inside the Mill at Bute Fabrics

Do you find that every once in a while a day comes along that blows your mind?

I am glad to say this happened to me last week when Bute Fabrics kindly invited me to see their mill on the Isle of Bute. It has to be said that arriving at the beautiful Victorian railway station at Wemyss Bay and walking onto the Caledonian MacBrayne ferry to sail over to Bute is a pretty good way to start to the day.

As I mentioned in my last post, production is something I find completely intriguing and walking into the mill at Bute fabrics was no exception. The mill has a similar feel to a whisky distillery in that it is made up of a series of long low buildings and the tour involves dashing outside from one building to another between wind, rain and the odd deer. However, there is no disguising the fact that this mill is making miles and miles of crafted fabric because the constant clack clack of the looms emanates around the site.

A quick glance around and you ask the question, how on earth does this complex set of odd looking machinery mean anything to anyone? How on earth does a single piece of yarn fed in at one end become a bale of highly prized designer cloth at the other? But cloth woven in this very room on this small Scottish island is being shipped off to customers such as Bank of America, Chap Lek Hok airport Hong Kong, the Sheraton Hotel in Moscow and Royal Festival Hall, London. Well the process can happen because the mill employs passionate people who have real skills. There was a tangible feeling of pride and heritage amongst the people I spoke to. Quite simply, they know they are producing something very good indeed and they are proud of it.

For me, discovering that Bute not only have their own range of cloth but can weave bespoke cloth in virtually any Pantone colour was the icing on the cake (I hope to visit the dyers in the Scottish Borders next). Can you imagine the possibilities this can open up? I firmly believe that designing home wares with a high quality raw material one needs to add very little embellishment at all. A simple form in the perfect colour in a natural material is hard beat.  Finding the perfect ingredients and then setting out to design something with it, in my mind is a pretty exciting way to start a project. Good raw materials speak for themselves.

This mill is only two hours away from where I work, which is quite far in Scottish terms but in reality is ridiculously close. The point I would like to make in this post is to encourage anyone reading this to find out what is being produced in their own area (and sometimes its not always very obvious) and just think of the opportunities it could offer. Embracing what we do well locally I am quite sure will help restore national pride. I for one am very proud to be from a country with mills such as Bute fabrics. What does your country or area produce that makes you feel proud?

Made in Britain

How important is it to you to buy products which have been grown or manufactured in your own country? Surely it’s a good way to get people back to work, instil some national pride and cut down on our carbon foot print?

Earlier this year I decided to produce a range of home wares and I was determined to design and manufacture them here in Great Britain. The first designs are a set of kitchen textiles which I think have architectural overtones. I am well aware that the market is awash with decorative kitchen textiles but I was keen to produce something for the contemporary kitchen – my designs can’t be described as pretty, and a friend actually thought they were quite masculine but I was pleased with that, it’s what I intended!

The designs are all screen printed – a long process but the best process for obtaining vibrant colours and colours that stay truer for longer. Digital printing is fine for some things but as it’s strong flat colour that interests me, screen printing was the answer (all the inks are water based causing minimal environmental impact). I decided to print onto linen union because the texture and slubs you find on linen gives the product more character.

So, they are designed and printed in Great Britain (including the brand label which has been woven) but I have paid the cost of taking this route. I hope it works out (I could have had them printed abroad for a fraction of the cost) but it gives me immense satisfaction having them produced here in Great Britain – I hope it is important to buyers too. I thought it was interesting to see that a new Made in UK  logo is set to appear in our shops next year.

My retailers would prefer me not to display the textiles until they have the stock (by the end of the month) which is why I have only inserted a tiny image of my proofs above.

Below are some of the reasons why I like living and working in Scotland. Where do you live and why?