Fashion Revolution Day

Who made my clothes?Colours threads

This is what Fashion Revolution are asking today. They remind us,

On 24 April 2013, 1133 people were killed and over 2500
were injured when the Rana Plaza factory complex
collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Social and environmental catastrophes
in our fashion supply chains continue.

Fashion Revolution says enough is enough.

They ask us to be curious and look at the labels on our clothes. Find out who made your clothes.

And remember to look what you have on your doorstep.

In Edinburgh we have many designers – look at Emily Millichip and 13 Threads and their cutting edge pieces. We have micro manufacturers Kalopsia Collective, supportive shops Concrete Wardrobe and brand ambassadors Scot Street Style. Together they not only make fashion exciting, bespoke and unique but they make it ethical.

Tonight Edinburgh College of Art will stage their 2015 Fashion/Costume/Textiles Show where their next generation of designers are propelled into the spot light. These young designers are hungry, motivated and will hopefully be the people designing and making our clothes in the future.

Do you have an art school near you? Have you been to see the students work? Do you have exciting local brands near you? If so, let us know who they are and what their story is so we can all support them.

And remember, look at your labels.

The Clothes Our Parents Wore

Having recently embarked upon designing my own textiles, I asked Mum and Dad to look through their photo albums and send me any snaps they had of Mum’s dresses in the late 1950’s. Well I wasn’t disappointed. Mum and Dad appeared looking out of the vintage, slightly crushed photos looking massively stylish…and look at the printed textiles.

These photos were all taken before I was born but I clearly remember the colours, designs and even textures of the cloth Mum and Dad both wore while I was growing up. It made me think how we all subliminally influence our children. The designs Mum and Dad chose are imprinted in my mind and have certainly affected my own taste as an adult (interestingly my eldest teenage son has just bought spectacles which are exactly the same as the ones my Dad, his Grand Father, wore in the late 1950’s).

How clearly I remember interior textiles that surrounded me too. The curtains that hung in our houses tended to be flat blocks of colour in varying but simplistic shapes, something I still crave and indeed base my own designs around. They favoured Danish furniture, something I do too. And then I started thinking a bit harder about my childhood interior and I remember a cylindrical copper suspension lamp shade that Dad (who is a scientist, not a designer) made for the dining room – all before Tom Dixon was even born!

The 1950’s and 1960’s were of course extremely creative decades where people had the confidence to experiment, customise and have fun with clothes and interiors. A time before the dominant big huge brands  that many seem to crave now. However, a wave of bespoke and individual designers which have global platforms like etsy and t.v programmes such as The Great British Sewing Bee have shown the public a glimpse of how much talent is out their and believe me, if you have any spare time, surf through etsy and be prepared to be amazed.

Do you remember the textiles your parents wore? If so, do you think they have influenced your choices as an adult?