Exhibiting at Best of Britannia

Just a quick note to say I will be exhibiting at Best of Britannia this Thursday 12th & Friday 13th October 2017 at The Old Trewman Brewery, Brick Lane, London.

BBD Logo Generic HR Generic

“Best of Britannia is an uplifting and inspirational retail and events platform for the growing number of people looking to purchase high quality products, made right here in Britain by people who take great pride in making things beautifully.

BOB is at the vanguard of a UK-wide phenomenon, as the manufacturing skills that were the foundation of Britain’s past prosperity undergo an extraordinary renaissance. From the Scottish Highlands to the South Downs, from Norwich to Penzance, we are witnessing the re-birth of the well-made object – the high-quality artefact, produced here by people who have honed their skills over generations. Craftsmen and women, artisans, designers and manufacturers have been curated and united here at BOB – we want to sell to the world the products from the men and women who have devoted themselves to their creation”

If you are in London, please drop by U Block Stand 24 to say hi and see the brand new collection of silk ties!

Tickets are free and are available from Evenbrite

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Top Drawer, London SS17 ‘Spotted’ Section Stand SP55

If you are in London next week it would be fantastic to see you – I will be exhibiting at Top Drawer , Olympia from Sunday 15th – Tuesday 17th January in the Spotted section, stand SP55 – please drop by if you can! It is a trade only show and you can register here.

Top Drawer, London SS17

Highlights include BBC2’s Great Pottery Throw Down judge, Keith Brymer Jones who will be throwing pots to a live audience and keynote speakers include Leanne Manfredi from the V&A, Lucy Lines from John Lewis, Bethan Williams-James from Liberty, Sally Bendelow from notonthehighstreet.com and Rebecca Hossain from the Design Museum.

There is also an eco product trail, a GB product trail (which includes my stand, named Niki Fulton), trend tracking fashion shows and loads more too – so wear your trainers, you could notch up several miles!

Like many other exhibitors, I will be launching several new pieces, including the Eclipse print now available in blue plus a brand new collection of bow-ties , both linen and silk pocket squares plus scarves, both silk and wool.

Blue Eclipse Linen Tie by Niki Fulton

Blue Eclipse Linen Tie

Fennel Tangle Linen Bow-tie by Niki Fulton

Fennel Tangle Linen Bow- Tie

Pink Fennel Silk Pocket Square by Niki Fulton

Pink Fennel Silk Pocket Square

Eclipse Linen Pocket Square

Eclipse Linen Pocket Square

…and if you are thinking it’s odd to have graphic prints (Eclipse) and floral prints (Fennel Tangle) in one collection , I have to confess that there are also stripes, abstract and painterly prints (and many colours) …some days I feel very bold and graphic and others lighter and painterly, don’t ask me why, it’s just the way I work so the ‘collection’ is pretty varied but then who wants to wear the same kind of look day in day out 😉

London Design Festival 2015

London Design Festival is such a big event and everyone who visits is bound to come away with their own highlights – here are some impressions I gathered and some pieces that caught my eye as I whizzed round 100% DesignDesign JunctionDesigners BlockTentShoreditch Design Triangle and of course the LDF at the V&A and Somerset House.

Faye Toogood's Cloakroom installation at the V&A

Faye Toogood’s Cloakroom installation at the V&A

One advantage of covering so many shows at top speed is that you get a sense of emerging trends and this year there seemed to be many crafted elements to the shows, for example metal elements were hammered and beaten (copper and brass still being prominent), there were plenty of hand woven textiles (some designers even had their looms with them) and timber was often hand turned. Digitally printed textiles also had a crafted vibe as many were hand painted designs which had been scanned and printed. The ceramics too felt really organic and I particularly enjoyed the pots at the Geffrye Museum where the potters were on hand to speak about their work. I came away thinking of individual designers and their processes rather than bigger manufactures. The festival really captured our desires of wanting authentic ethical artistic pieces rather than anonymous mass manufactured work.

Textiles by Jonna Saarinen

Textiles by Jonna Saarinen

Loom Demo at Tent London

Loom Demo at Tent

Tactile soft surfaces at 100% Design

Tactile soft surfaces at 100% Design

For me, the highlight was an exhibition at Designers Block called The Secret Life of the Pencil‘ a collaborative project by industrial designer Alex Hammond, and photographer Mike Tinney. They photographed pencils belonging to successful designers, writers, and architects such as Philippe Starck, Lord Norman Foster, Anish Kapoor, John Pawson, Dame Zandra Rhodes and closely photographed their humble pencils which actually told a lot amount about their owners. It was staggering how easy it was to guess which pencil belonged to whom. It certainly made me look at my own pencil in a new light.. normally a coloured one.

Tom Dixon's pencil

Tom Dixon’s pencil

Anish Kapoor's pencil

Anish Kapoor’s pencil

John Pawson's pencil

John Pawson’s pencil

James Dyson's pencil

James Dyson’s pencil

But the exhibit that I continue to think about is Connected by Pattern at Somerset House. A room filled with 3D monochromatic patterns which you were invited to immerse yourself in after putting on a patterned poncho hanging by the entrance of the room. Every house should have a room like this! You become instantly lost in a creative world of pattern, it was liberating, extremely fun and seemed to take you back into the fantastical mind set of a child. Brilliant.

Connected by Pattern

Connected by Pattern

It was also refreshing seeing the introduction of Asian design this year. China had a big stand at 100% Design and their accessories in particular were eye catching in their simplicity. The Korean displays at Tent were also stunning, ‘simple, calm, subtle‘ was their mantra and based on traditional Korean craft, Kim Soo Young + Cho Ki Sang’s, brass tableware was dreamy and current.

Kim Soo Young + Cho Ki Sang, Brass Tableware

Kim Soo Young + Cho Ki Sang, Brass Tableware

There is so much more I could tell you about, not least the sublime Pip McCormac chocolate brownies laced with turkish delight and edible flowers that he made for Lee Broom’s The Flower Shop Installation in Shoreditch or being turfed out of the The Shard on the 32nd floor for wearing trainers (a blessing actually as the cacao cocktails in Borough Market were a much better choice 😉

Lee Broom Store

Lee Broom Store

Lee Broom's The Flower Shop' Installation

Lee Broom’s The Flower Shop’ Installation

Pip McCormac's , The Herb and Flower Cook Book

Pip McCormac’s , The Herb and Flower Cook Book

However, this post is long enough but if you would like to see more snaps, I’ve posted some on instagram.

Thank you London Design Festival , that was the best one I’ve attended and I’m already looking forward to 2016!

3rd May, Makers Market Edinburgh. 7th May, The Turpentine, London

For anyone in Edinburgh tomorrow, Saturday the 3rd of May, who fancies visiting a Makers Market in Morningside, I will be exhibiting and be delighted to see you there.

Makers Market

 

For anyone in London on Wednesday 7th May, why not pop along to a new creative hub The Turpentine in the heart of Brixton, a brand new exciting stockist for unifiedspace

The Turpentine Opening

 

More news on stockists next week…

London Design Festival – Trend Two and Three

I mentioned in my last post that I could see three distinct trends emerge from  London Design Festival – a colour, a shape and a material  – so here are the final two trends that I promised.

Looking at form, many designs were oval, circular with marine like quality, almost ethereal and organic looking.

To further soften the shapes, some of the designs were finished in a soft rubberised, ultra matt finish which blurred the edges into a soft and tactile product.

In my mind, the best product from the entire festival, which slots into this circular trend, was the M lamp designed by David Irwin for Juniper. Irwin was inspired by British 19th century miner’s lamps such as the Georgie, Davy and Carbide lamps. Pared down, simple and practical, the M lamp is a wireless (powered by a lithium iron phosphate rechargeable battery) easily transportable, beautiful object. I am certainly coveting one for a bedside lamp – it also dims – but I can visualise it in countless positions around my house.

As you will know, lace has been a dominant force in the design world recently and it’s a theme that is set to continue. It was evident that many designers have looked at the qualities of lace and have used other materials which are semi- transparent, cut-out, and mesh like.

The final theme was extremely prevalent – the use of pale timber. Having been to most of the venues in the festival I don’t recall seeing any dark woods at all. Pale oak, ash and birch were however almost exclusively pared with blocks of fresh vibrant colour whether painted like many of Lermont Hupton pieces or used with coloured felt like Barnby and Day‘s felt and ash stool.

Most of these trends rely on contrast – soft wool next to hard timber, a burst of urgent red in an otherwise white room, a gentle organic form giving a solid and practical solution. But the display of Mimicry chairs from the Japanese design studio Nendo in the Victoria and Albert’s tapestry room has left the longest impression with me due to its seemingly very stark contrast with its surrounding.

At first glance it looks to be in complete contrast to its surrounding – a modern, light, sharp design placed within a dimly lit room filled with ancient two dimensional soft tapestries. A total contrast surely? But no, the Mimicry was designed to mimic its surrounding. The huge frame rising from the chair I guess represents the shape of the massive tapestries, the seemingly never ending perspective again mimicking the almost life- like scenes depicted in the textiles or representing the endless corridors in the castles these tapestries are normally found in? The position of a chair to the side of the artwork exactly where an antique chair would be found next to a tapestry – there are probably more similarities, you may well spot some so let me know if you do. It took me a while to register this play on design but it reminded me to look carefully and think about what I see. Something Charles Eames asked his potential employees in interviews – ‘if you can see and you can think, I can work with you’

London Design Festival 2012 – the Red Trend

London Design Festival is a great time to visit the city as the number of design shows, workshops, pop up shops are phenomenal and this year was no exception.

After visiting 100% DesignTent LondonDesign JunctionDesigners Block, the Conran Shop, and of course the Design Festival at the V&A,  three very clear trends emerged from the shows.

The first was obvious as London had turned red! The launch of the Louis Vuitton and Kusama collection was celebrated by the facade of Selfridges  being bathed in red hot light and the shop floor being covered in huge red spots. A lot of people were wearing red jeans too…

The Conran Shop who were launching a beautifully pared down and updated Soda Stream (the perfect Christmas present) designed by Yves Behar decided to show a collection of design classics – all chosen in red which when set against their trade mark blue walls looked stunning. It was interesting looking at chair designs spanning the twentieth and twenty first centuries all being shown in the same colour as it forced you to consider the form of the chair more than you may have done had they been shown in their original colours.

I suspect red is a micro trend derived from ‘London 2012’ and all things red, white and blue as the colour trend predictors tell us that green is the predominant colour for 2013. However, it was certainly an ingenious and arresting colour to use in the exhibitions as the excitement around the shows was palpable.

The other two trends (more subtle) I shall put in my next post – this is just a quick post to celebrate all things red.

Back soon with the next post.

London: a Riot of Colour

I have to admit to not quite knowing where to start with today’s post. I spent last week in London, a city that never fails to blow my mind, and last week was no exception. It was of course in the throws of London Fashion Week and the The Brit Awards which meant that the shop windows were groomed and styled to perfection.

Strong colour trends were clearly visible throughout London. Blocks of coral crashing into great chunks of Klein blue and 70’s purples anchored by spicy tans and cinnamon hues – tribal colours without the pattern, instead emerging in great blocky geometric shapes.

As if I needed any more colour stimulus, I made a trip to the David Hockney exhibition ‘A Bigger Picture’. Suddenly you find yourself looking at the English countryside though a new set of eyes. To say the exhibition is vibrant, energetic, zesty would somehow be an understatement. This huge exhibition positively bursts off the walls of the Royal Academy with a ramped up sense of optimism and freshness. I would strongly recommend you to watch Andrew Marr’s interview with David Hockney on last nights The Culture Show – so much can be learnt from the mind of this artistic genius. As Hockney says, ‘everything becomes interesting if you really look’, I couldn’t agree more.

looking at patterns and exaggerating colour in Fife

Space is something David Hockney often talks of, particularly where one thing stops and another thing starts. Where two colours meet is something I am intensely interested in as the energy created at the boundaries of adjoining colours is the perfect fusion of art and science. But infinite space is one of  Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s enduring obsessions.  Her show at Tate Modern is one of the most fascinating exhibitions I have ever seen.

It shows her work constantly changing over the decades which probably mirrors her life which includes living in rural Japan, New York, Tokyo and for the last thirty years living voluntarily in a  psychiatric institution where she has created work hoping to show the psychological trauma she so often feels and wants to escape from. Leaving the exhibition you must navigate through a darkened room covered in mirrors and tiny coloured lights which completely disorientate you and seem to stretch out to infinity. It really is something you should experience if you are in London.

Apologies for the lack of photographs on this post but I couldn’t take my camera into the exhibitions. I’ve also been very busy creating some new products – I’m still at the messy stage but I am really pleased with the pieces that I started in Iceland last month.  I hope to have images up soon!