Local Heroes Design Boutique at G&V Hotel – and a Competition!

An exciting commission came in this month when Dr.Stacey Hunter, curator and director of Local Heroes Design invited me to take part in her Love Design project. The theme was ‘modern elegance’ with a colour palette inspired by 1930’s Miami.

I was to design a collection of linen union ties and bowties,  (I was inspired by two iconic Miami buildings – more on that below). Jeweller Euan McWhirter designed a stack of bracelets made from interwoven gemstones and crystalline Swarovski shapes, Karen Mabon a silk pocket square which gentlemen can fold into a jacket pocket while ladies can wear around the neck as a gavroche in the Parisian style. Emma McDowall created a pastel concrete coin dish and vase to reflect the designer’s interest in colour and material play and Moira Warren of Patience Jewellery created diamond and lemon quartz drop earrings designed to convert from stud to elegant drop.

Local Heroes Competition

Local Heroes Design Love Design Project designers

Left to right: Moira Warren, Niki Fulton, Karen Mabon, Euan McWhirter, Emma McDowall. Photo by Ross Fraser McLean.

The showcase is on display until the end of February at the five star G&V Hotel on Edinburgh’s Royal Mile, and by the way, the hotel has a stunning interior which has just been designed by Graven Images design studio…and also has rather a good cocktail bar, The Epicurian. 

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Love Design showcase G&V Hotel

miami-collection-collage

Ties & bowties for Love Design, Local Heroes Design

The Freedom bowtie (top right) is a print inspired by the iconic Freedom Tower in Miami, which was completed in 1925. I enjoyed thinking about this buildings purpose over time – originally as a printing facility then as a centre for helping Cuban refugees and now as a museum and cultural education centre. The tower is tall and linear and its sandy yellow facade is broken up by many windows. The blue in the design is to represent the blue waters of the adjacent Biscayne sea.

Lovewell Tie

Lovewell Tie

The Lovewell print has been inspired by the iconic Miami Post Office designed by architect Howard Lovewell Cheney  completed in 1937. The pale pink rotunda with prominent cupola of the post office offset by the green lawns is what initiated the circular design and pale colour palette. The tie has a wedding vibe to it…another reason I called it the Lovewell.

Anyway, more importantly, the details for the competition!

 

Local Heroes Competition

Pop into G&V Royal Mile Hotel at 1 George IV Bridge to win one of 5 Scottish design objects. To enter, tag your Instagram photo with #GandVlovedesign and follow @gandvhotel or @epicurean_bar before the end of February.

G&V Royal Mile Hotel Edinburgh will pick five lucky winners who will each receive one of the prizes listed below.

PRIZES

Miami Signal Tie by Niki Fulton

Silk Pocket Square by Karen Mabon

Concrete Vase by Emma McDowall

Concrete Coin Dish by Emma McDowall

Rope Bracelet by Euan McWhirter

 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

  • Entrants can apply if already following @gandvhotel or @epicurean_bar on Instagram
  • Entrants can enter competition multiple times
  • To enter competition users have to follow @gandvhotel or @epicurean_bar on Instagram (or already be following), tag their photo with @gandvhotel or @epicurean_bar and use hashtag #GandVlovedesign
  • Winners will be notified through Instagram
  • G&V Royal Mile Hotel Edinburgh retain the right to amend or change the competition at any time
  • Winner will recieve one of 5 stated prizes (Subject to availability and change at G&V’s discretion).
  • Winners are required to provide a valid address for delivery of prize
  • Winners to be chosen by G&V Royal Mile Hotel Edinburgh Social Media Department
  • Competition to run between 10 and 28 February 2017
  • By entering the G&V Royal Mile Hotel Edinburgh photo competition you give us permission to distribute your image across any other G&V Marketing channel
  • Winners will be notified within 2 weeks of winning

The Route I Took

Someone asked me a question this week which I couldn’t answer. Well, I could but it would have taken too long. It was a good question and the answer might be useful to some.

So I was telling her about a travel grant I was awarded last month by Cultural Enterprise Office  (CEO) to visit three Paris Trade Shows. It was a modest grant, just enough for a budget air fair, metro ticket and the entry cost for the shows. The question she asked was, ‘how did you get this grant?’

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Premiere Classe and Who’s Next Trade Shows

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Tranoi Trade Show, Paris.

Warning…it’s a long answer… it’s taken 51 years i.e my lifetime (!) My career has grown organically because I’ve squished it, dropped it and reformed it to wrap around my own circumstances. So this post outlines my long way round route to the grant. I hope it doesn’t read like a cv, that’s not the intention, but it may be helpful to see the steps I took as I know a lot of people are either having or wanting to have a refreshing late career.

I’ve always been (and have written previous posts about this) of the belief that the very early years are extremely influential in later life. I think the toys we constantly handled as toddlers, the prints our parents wore, the textures of wall coverings, blankets and textiles that surrounded us all seep into our souls. I’m also certain the obsession British childrens TV had in the late ’60’s early ’70’s on visiting the insides of factories (remember the milk bottling one….) laid the foundations of my utter fascination with manufacturing…and to my absolute joy took me to a paint factory, Tikkurila in Helsinki with my job decades later.

1960s

Mum in a bold print and our house mid 1960’s

Mum had been working in The Denmark Room, a place in central Edinburgh which served smørrebrøds, Carlsberg and sold Danish homewares while Dad although a genetic scientist, enjoyed making things and the copper light (top right) is something I still love decades later. Their friends mainly consisted of Edinburgh College of Art graduates so the house always had pictures hanging. Looking at the photos now I can say firstly that Mum still has, and uses virtually everything in them and secondly, I know the things so intimately I could describe them in great detail with my eyes shut. I would like to say my current designs have been influenced by this environment and believe that is Part One of the long journey towards the travel grant.

Part Two, fast track to university. I studied geography. Whats that got to do with design you may ask? Quite a lot in an odd way. Geography is observation, people, process and  pattern and that’s exactly what I’m doing now, making patterns from observations.

Part Three – jobs. For many years I worked for Inhouse, a company with inspiring showrooms in Edinburgh and Glasgow displaying contemporary furniture, lighting and accessories – this was the 1980’s before modern design became mainstream and I was trained under the watchful eye of the late architect Bill Potter and his wife Sylvia. They taught me everything I know about contemporary designers and it’s where my obsession with Italian designer Achille Castiglioni’s started (and continues). I was also working for The Open Eye Gallery, which specialises in contemporary Scottish art so I was absorbing design and colour every day at work. Fast track several more years and I was working for a paint company designing colour palettes for their interior range…by this time, colour was the ‘thing’ that motivated me.

Part Four, I set up on my own. At this point, my story may become useful to you as its tells you who helped me on my way. However, I have written about this part in previous posts so I will be very brief.

In 2015, I launched my first mens ties after being encouraged to print textiles by Solii Brodie of BeFab Be Creative. Gordon Miller of Scot Street Style was very supportive and took the collection over to New York to officially launch in Brooklyn during Tartan Week – he did this for no financial gain to himself, he just believed in the product and was proud to show America contemporary Scottish design.

Then I was introduced to Creative Edinburgh ,‘a network of creatives in Edinburgh, committed to advancing the value and impact of creativity, both locally and internationally’. They helped me connect to others working in similar fields. They encouraged me to take part in The Fruitmarket Gallery Design Market which helped me reach out to a very receptive local audience and is also where I met  an executive from Scottish Enterprise who gave me lots of useful links. After that Craft Scotland invited me to take part in their 2016 Edinburgh Festival Summer Show, again, widening my reach. Scotland Re:Designed then invited me to design a new print celebrating the iconic Paisley Pattern and exhibit at their Paisley Make event. At Paisley Make I was told about Cultural Enterprise Office and I enrolled to receive free mentoring. They strongly suggested I improve my social media (arg, still working on that), build a better website – I’ve done that, it’s now branded Niki Fulton rather than my company name ‘unifiedspace’ and to prepare my range for export – which finally gets me to the point…this is why they gave me the travel grant. The reasoning is that if my brand does well, I shall eventually employ people and if I start to export, well that’s obviously good too. When they awarded the grant, they knew I had been invited by Charlotte Abrahams to exhibit in the Spotted area of Top Drawer, a London Trade Show in January 2017 (something Craft Scotland had encouraged me to do). So what I’m keen to explain is that in this time of austerity, it may seem a little feckless to be sent over to Paris on a grant. But, the award is very carefully thought through and CEO have calculated that it might be worthwhile not just for me but for others too if I can get the brand to take off.

I did warn you it’s a long answer, you may have even forgotten the question by now, (how did I qualify for a CEO grant)  but I felt it was maybe useful for others to see the huge list of people and organisations that have really helped me get to this point. As I said it has been a slow organic build and the more conventional way would be by doing a related degree, textiles for instance, and building your business up much quicker. However my design knowledge has been the 10,000 hour route rather than the Art College route so it has taken a lot longer. I hope I can prove CEO right and do well abroad, I will certain try my hardest. And on that positive note, there is an exciting project opening tomorrow, more on that next time and thank you, if you have, for reaching the end of this post!

 

‘Paisley Make’ with Scotland Re:Designed for Paisley 2021

Did you know that the town of Paisley is entering the bid to become UK City of Culture 2021? Despite having lived in Scotland all my life, I had never, until yesterday ever been to Paisley – only ninety minutes from my home in Edinburgh (and around fifteen minutes by train from Glasgow). And this is what I found. Pretty impressive, yes?

Paisley

Paisley Abbey and Town Hall.

You will however, like me, be familiar with Paisley Pattern and as Dan Coughlan, Paisley Pattern Shawl Curator at Paisley Museum said, “during the 18th and 19th centuries, Paisley was one of the leading towns in Europe for the manufacture of high quality fashion fabrics…and much of the legacy of this great textile tradition is now preserved in Paisley Museum“. In fact the museums textile collection holds “what is thought to be the largest collection of shawls in the world, together with many pattern books containing an enormous variety of original Paisley designs”. 

Cotton Street

Street names reflecting Paisley’s textile heritage

So, a town famed for its patterns (not to mention the incredible history associated with its Abbey which was founded in 1163) asked Scotland Re:Designed to curate an exhibition showcasing contemporary Scottish textile designers as part of Paisley Make , a festival celebrating its pattern heritage under the umbrella of the Paisley 2021 bid.

When I was invited to be part of the showcase, I have to admit, I was more than delighted. I immediately researched the history of Paisley Pattern and looked at several examples of the print. I could see that over the decades, Paisley Pattern had inspired swathes of designers and there are literally millions of examples from across the world – lush and supremely detailed forms of Paisley to simplified and psychedelic examples from the 1960’s to contemporary companies such a Sweden’s Happy Socks who are still celebrating the lure of the Paisley Pattern.

Paisley

Paisley Knits for the Cloisters at Paisley Abbey by Dyane Lanez of Tout Petit

If you know the kind of patterns I normally design, you will know that Paisley Print is miles from my usual stable. However, a pattern has emerged from this whole Paisley project and is currently being printed by the BeFabBeCreative sisters in Leith, Edinburgh. Warning though…you will not look at it and say, ‘Paisley Print’!  – it is a heavily distilled unifiedspace version of Paisley Pattern – images coming soon 🙂

So back to Paisley Make and the pattern showcase which runs until Saturday 3rd September in Paisley Abbey. Work from twenty seven designers is on display and there are talks by speakers such as the enviable and effervescent Penny Martin, Editor in Chief of The Gentlewoman magazine.

bloggers

Fashion bloggers at Paisley Make

Penny Martin

Penny Martin of The Gentlewoman magazine talking about the magazine’s creation.

Fennel Tangle

unifiedspace stand at Paisley Make. Picture of ‘Fennel Tangle’ wool scarf.

FullSizeRender

unifiedspace at Paisley Make

So if you would like to see some beautiful Paisley lace from the legendary Scottish lace mill MYB Textiles or a very contemporary collection from emerging designers from The Fashion Foundry or indeed patterns and prints from any of the other twenty seven designers, I would urge you to take a trip into the magnificent Paisley Abbey before 4pm this Saturday – I certainly wish I hadn’t left it this long before visiting the Abbey.

Good luck Paisley 2021 in your bid and thank you for asking me to show my prints in such an important textile town.

Craft Scotland, Edinburgh Summer Show

You don’t need me to point out how many events are on just now in the Edinburgh Fringe and Edinburgh International Festival – but I will anyway – over 30,000 Fringe performances alone – it’s the biggest arts festival in the world.  And in Venue 205, Craft Scotland occupies the 2nd floor of White Stuff ,89 George Street, Edinburgh until Sunday 28th August 2016.

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Work by Clod & Pebble, Hilary Grant Knitwear, Warped Textiles, Clare Dawdry.

Thirty one Scottish makers – potters, textile designers, jewellers and furniture makers – were selected to be part of this years Summer Show, unifiedspace being one of them. So I took the opportunity of launching some brand new designs for scarves and ties, discussed in more detail in this interview.

Breton Signal

‘Breton Signal’ 100% Irish Linen Tie & Pocket Square.

I’ve added 100% Irish Linen ties to the range. I’m still producing the original Fife linen union ties (available from Urban Reivers Festival Shop on George Street) but I’ve been asked for slightly more formal ties and the finer texture of the Irish linen achieves a fairly polished look – don’t worry, the ties are not going all corporate in nature, the prints are anything but!

There are 100% silk scarves in the same print – just in case you want to go out ‘matching’?! I’ve also added some gender neutral skinny scarves/cravats, silk squares and gauzy wool and cashmere blends for the Autumn.

scarf Night Hatching 3

‘Night Hatching’ 100% Silk Scarf

Love You, designed by Niki Fulton

‘Love You’ Wool & Cashmere blend scarf

If you would like to hear a little more behind the scenes chat at unifiedspace HQ, Creative Edinburgh kindly arranged for filmmaker David P Scott to shoot this short vimeo.

You might hear in the film I mention a new bespoke service. More about that soon but essentially, it’s about commissioning your own print/pattern – one which reflects your story, your colours, your life – a modern portrait if you like, and one that can be worn.

Also, lots happening next week too so another post will follow very soon regarding the run up to the Paisley 2021 City of Culture bid.

Meanwhile, enjoy the final week of the Edinburgh Festival and Fringe and please pop into the Craft Scotland Edinburgh Summer Show if you can – there’s a special late night opening this Thursday 25th August and I believe even some goodie bags are to be had!

 

 

The Fruitmarket Gallery Design Market

If you are in Edinburgh this weekend it would be great to see you at The Fruitmarket Gallery Design Market which will be running from Friday 10th, (Preview 5-9pm) Saturday 11th, 10am-6pm & Sunday 12th, 10am-5pm. Around 40 independent makers and designers will be showing and selling their work.

silk scarf

‘Love You’ Silk Scarf

 

I’ve been experimenting with some new prints and will be assessing which designs to take forward to the Craft Scotland Summer Show during the  Edinburgh Fringe Festival so I will have several promotions on over the weekend to hopefully encourage feedback.

silk scarf

‘Eden’ Silk Scarf

Most designers bring out a cohesive ‘collection’ each season but because of the way I work, my prints are fairly discordant – you have been warned!

The way it works for me, perhaps you are the same (please let me know, I’m really interested) is that when I am least expecting it (usually when I am about to drop off to sleep), a fully formed image falls into my mind. The next day I go about recreating this image – an image that seemed to appear from nowhere. The ‘mysterious’ image however, can easily be traced back directly to an experience. So as we all have many experiences in life, the ‘pot’ to draw from is pretty extensive (hence the diverse prints). So that’s why, for me anyway, it’s imperative to get out as much as possible and explore because every time I do, my mind is busy in the background drawing from the experience and creating the next print.

So that’s the process or perhaps an explanation.

silk scarf

‘Breton Signal’ Silk Scarf. Photo by Abi Radford

 

The prints are unisex (can a pattern be gender specific anyway?!) so you will see prints on both silk scarves and on linen neck ties.

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‘Eden’ Linen Tie

I will also be bringing a new product – long wool and cashmere open weave scarves – only a few – so if you would like one, please be quick.

wool scarf

‘Fennel Tangle’ Wool & Cashmere Scarf. Photo by Abi Radford.

Another new product is the wool ‘Charger Pouch’. Ok, yes, I know, that’s a bit specific and they can be used for other purposes too – coins, lens caps, lipstick, jewellery bag – but I find them especially useful while travelling. Having a brightly coloured soft wool pouch to pack my phone charger in (I can’t be the only one who fuddles about in my bag searching for said charger, can I?) is of great comfort. They are designed for the minimalist at heart who craves a block of tactile colour and has a very guilty secret pleasure (sssh, I won’t spill the beans on you but they have a patterned lining – linen off cuts from the ties to be precise, we don’t like to waste at unifiedspace).

wool and linen pouches

Wool (and linen) Charger Pouches

So new prints, new products and many other designers all housed in the Fruitmarket Gallery which of course is also home to Milk Cafe . It would be great to see you this weekend! (10th – 12th June 2016)

If you have a sec, can you tell me what your favourite colour to wear is please?

 

 

 

Now Stocked by Wear Eponymous

Just a quick post today to announce the great news that the full collection of linen ties are now being stocked by Wear Eponymous .

Wear Eponymous

Wear Eponymous brings,

“the cream of current design talent UK wide and beyond. This isn’t the place for fast fashion or disposable purchases, this is the destination for investment pieces, stand-out accessories and unique treats”

Take a look through their site if you are looking for ethically produced independent brands and if you are quick they are currently running a great competition to win a beautiful leather VVA handbag designed by Sarah Haran.

Next post on recent travels to Norway and the London Design Festival coming shortly…

The Journey of a Linen Tie

The Slow Food Movement has been an inspiration to many and knowing that we have superb textile mills in Scotland I was very keen to produce a product with similar credentials. Scroll down and see the faces behind the various stages of production of my new range of linen ties.

Twenty nine miles from Edinburgh lies a bespoke weavers, Peter Greig, which has been weaving from the same site since 1825. 

Stacking the Flax.

Stacking the Flax. Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

Flax which is used in the production of linen used to be grown in Scotland and Ireland but as Angus Nicoll, Managing Director of Peter Greig explains, our climate is not as well suited as the Benelux countries.

“All the retting that used to happen in Scotland and Ireland was Water retted rather than the standard Dew Retting that is now the norm in the Benelux Countries. The problem with the Scottish and Irish climate is that through July and August we cannot rely on clear skies and warm weather. The climate in Holland, Belgium and France is far more reliable and so the flax straw can be turned daily in the fields and the Dew rets (rots) the straw off the outside of the plant as it is damp in the morning then dried during the day. With our inclement weather the rain comes solidly through all of July and August and the whole plant never dries in the field and as a result the whole plant goes black and rots”

So, the flax is now grown and spun into yarn in the drier European countries before being prepared and woven at Peter Greigs.

Linseed Pods. Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

Linseed Pods.
Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

 

Warping the Yarn Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

Warping the Yarn
Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

Weaving in Progress. Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

Weaving in Progress.
Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

Weaving the Flax

Weaving the Flax

Inspecting the Cloth Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

Inspecting the Cloth
Photo kindly supplied by Peter Greig

And meanwhile, I design the patterns for printing onto the linen from my studio in Edinburgh

Dreaming up my next textile design

Dreaming up my next textile design

Then the plain linen is delivered to sisters Solii and Zoe at BeFabBeCreative, a printing bureau in Edinburgh where they print my designs onto the Fife linen.

Solii Brodie at BeFabBeCreative

Solii Brodie at BeFabBeCreative

From here, I take the printed cloth to Nina Falk, Creative Director at Kalopsia Collective, Edinburgh who stitches the cloth into ties. Kalopsia search for industrial equipment that is no longer being used and save the pieces from being scrapped. They refurbish them and the machines are used in their micro manufacturing facility at Ocean Terminal. Zero Waste Scotland are supporting this venture as it is a great example of the merits of a circular economy.

Nina Falk, Creative Director at Kalopsia Collective

Nina Falk, Creative Director at Kalopsia Collective

Once the ties are stitched, I package them with the story behind the inspiration for each design and Edinburgh photographer, Abi Radford, photographs them.

Photographer Abi Radford and model Jo Radford.

Photographer Abi Radford and model Jo Radford.

The passionate Gordon Millar of Scot Street Style launched my collection of  ties during Tartan Week in Brooklyn, New York earlier this year and their Edinburgh launch was at Design Weekend at the The Fruitmarket Gallery in May.

I have been working on the concept of linen ties since January so having worked for the last seven months with the wonderful creative people I have introduced you to in this post, it gives me a huge amount of satisfaction seeing the finished product and importantly selling this locally produced tie to people who are searching for ethically produced textiles from Scotland. The ties have a distinct character and attitude (I like to refer to them as my bad boy ties!) and I’ve been told offer some good chic-geek vibes around the office (!) so mix up your wardrobe and add some Scottish linen or if you are fed up with ‘double denim’ go the full hog and start a movement for ‘triple linen’ 😉

Thank you everyone who have helped make and launch the ties and thank you to all those buying them too.

And there is a new design coming out at the end of this week, it’s a special summer tie called ‘Prufrock’, one to be worn with white flannel trousers to walk along the beach…any guesses where the inspiration for this ones lies?

Large Patterns in the Landscape

A very quick post today, really just to show you some massive patterns I’ve been spotting and enjoying in the countryside just outside Edinburgh. They are of course man made by farmers. Green field of crops Ploughed field with tree shadows crops       Don’t worry, the frost has gone, the photos below were taken in Winter. Frosty road P1010815

fields

Lots of fun things going on at unifiedspace right now, more on that next week.

Have a great weekend and let me know if you spot any huge patterns near you.

Fashion Revolution Day

Who made my clothes?Colours threads

This is what Fashion Revolution are asking today. They remind us,

On 24 April 2013, 1133 people were killed and over 2500
were injured when the Rana Plaza factory complex
collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Social and environmental catastrophes
in our fashion supply chains continue.

Fashion Revolution says enough is enough.

They ask us to be curious and look at the labels on our clothes. Find out who made your clothes.

And remember to look what you have on your doorstep.

In Edinburgh we have many designers – look at Emily Millichip and 13 Threads and their cutting edge pieces. We have micro manufacturers Kalopsia Collective, supportive shops Concrete Wardrobe and brand ambassadors Scot Street Style. Together they not only make fashion exciting, bespoke and unique but they make it ethical.

Tonight Edinburgh College of Art will stage their 2015 Fashion/Costume/Textiles Show where their next generation of designers are propelled into the spot light. These young designers are hungry, motivated and will hopefully be the people designing and making our clothes in the future.

Do you have an art school near you? Have you been to see the students work? Do you have exciting local brands near you? If so, let us know who they are and what their story is so we can all support them.

And remember, look at your labels.

Ties Launching at NYTartan Week

I am happy to report that Edinburgh is most certainly riding a creative wave. Being an 80:20 kind of person (specialising in almost ‘getting there’ but often not being able to see the wood for the trees for the last 20% of a project) I have discovered that collaborations are most definitely the way to go.

'Chalk' print on linen designed by Niki Fulton available from Printed and Co

‘Chalk’ print on linen designed by Niki Fulton available from Printed and Co

I met sisters Solii and Zoe Brodie from BeFabBeCreative fabric print bureau in Edinburgh over a year ago and they have proven to be the catalyst for turning my designs and aspirations into physical products. They print my patterns onto a variety of natural fabrics (locally sourced Fife linen being one of my favourites) in the most astoundingly efficient manner. They also own Printed and Co, a carefully curated collection of textile designs stemming from ten U.K based designers, of which I am delighted to be one. Customers can purchase lengths of any of the designs on any of their fabrics allowing the patterns to be used in dressmaking or interiors. Wonderful flexibility and it is all printed to order so no waste either.

'Pear Drops Tan' on linen designed by Niki Fulton. Available from Printed and Co

‘Pear Drops Tan’ on linen designed by Niki Fulton. Available from Printed and Co

So I have a smooth and enjoyable means to produce textile designs but I also wanted to manufacture products. Enter Nina, a Swede living in Edinburgh with an armful of design related Degrees, a Swedish fashion label behind her and honed seamstress skills.

Botanical DNA and Falling Apples available from Printed and Co

Botanical DNA and Falling Apples available from Printed and Co

She is the Creative Director at Kalopsia Collective, an agency that works with textiles from concept to manufacture. Nina knows what I am describing before I even reach the end of my sentence so our collaboration is working like clockwork and I now have silk scarfs, linen make up bags, mens ties (more on that in a sec) and some silk tops in my range, some of which are available from my Etsy Shop (more being listed very soon).

'Chalk' on silk. Designed by Niki Fulton. Available per metre from Printed and Co

‘Chalk’ on silk. Designed by Niki Fulton. Available per metre from Printed and Co

 

'Lines' on silk designed by Niki Fulton. Available per metre from Printed and Co

‘Lines’ on silk designed by Niki Fulton. Available per metre from Printed and Co

But my biggest focus is currently on a niche market, a micro market I suppose. On a trip to Rome last October, I was searching for a replacement watch strap. I popped into a shop selling leather luggage and asked them if they sold watch straps. The manager literally took a step backwards and looked at me square on and said, ‘No! I sell luggage!’ My stupidity seemed to offend him but when I looked rather sheepish he softened his voice and said, ‘you need to visit Marco‘ and directed me to a tiny slim shop with a wise old man sitting under a vintage task light replacing watch straps. Attached to the wall were literally hundreds of shades and widths of beautiful watch straps and of course I found the perfect strap. Mission accomplished. I doubt if anyone would go to that shop and not find precisely what they were looking for. It was therefore very well known and a ‘go to’ destination – nobody would even think to waste their time shopping around. Job done.

With this new mind set I asked where I could buy a pair of leather gloves for my friends 50th birthday, Sergio di Cori, Piazza di Spagna of course. Again, every conceivable colour and length of leather glove were there displayed on beautiful panelled walls. They sold nothing else. Don’t complicate the process, they sell gloves, brilliantly.

So I finally reach the point in telling you this tale. I want to sell linen ties. Linen I hear you say. Yes linen, not silk. I want to design ties less ‘officey’  than silk which will convey more individuality and hopefully more spirit. Laid back formal. I want a ‘Slow Food Movement’ kind of tie. In other words I want a tie that is designed, made and stitched locally on locally sourced linen. Designs that have slowly been forming over, in my case, many years. And this is what I’ve been working on and by the end of this week, six patterns will be finished and be safely delivered into the hands of Scot Street Style who is kindly launching them in New York City during New York Tartan Week. My ties are not tartan in case you were wondering but Tartan Week celebrates all kinds of Scottish business and I am thrilled to have them represented there.

Linen Ties designed by Niki Fulton

Linen Ties designed by Niki Fulton

Below are other bolts of fabric waiting to be made into ties – cloth is cut on the diagonal for ties so these designs will look quite different when they are made up.

So more on the tie development soon and look out for NYTartan Week pictures on Facebook and Twitter.

Do you go to a specialist ‘go to’ shop for anything? 

 

'Eclipse' print designed by Niki Fulton

‘Eclipse’ print designed by Niki Fulton

Richter Red designed by Niki Fulton

‘Richter Red’ print designed by Niki Fulton (as in Richter magnitude scale)

'Cog' print designed by Niki Fulton.  A new take on pinstripe.

‘Cog’ print designed by Niki Fulton. A new take on pinstripe.